Joyce Hilda Banda | president of Malawi

Joyce Hilda Banda, née Joyce Hilda Mtila, (born April 12, 1950, Malemia, Nyasaland [now Malawi]), Malawian politician who served as vice president (2009–12) and president (2012–14) of Malawi. She was the first woman to serve as head of state anywhere in Southern Africa.

Banda’s official government profile states that she obtained a bachelor’s degree from Atlantic International University, an online university based in the United States. During her first marriage, to Roy Kachale, she lived in Nairobi, where she became active in the women’s movement. Her personal experience in an abusive marriage shaped her evolving career in grassroots activism and politics, as did her subsequent marriage to Richard Banda, a barrister would who would later serve as chief justice of Malawi (1992–2002) and whom she credited as being supportive of her efforts. Before focusing on politics, Joyce Banda founded and directed various businesses and organizations, including a garment-manufacturing business, a bakery, the National Association of Business Women of Malawi, and the Joyce Banda Foundation, an organization dedicated to rural development and improving the lives of women and children.

In 2004 Banda was elected to the National Assembly as a member of the ruling United Democratic Front (UDF); the next year she moved to the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), formed by Pres. Bingu wa Mutharika, under whom she served as minster of gender, child welfare, and community services (2004–06) and as minister of foreign affairs (2006–09). In her various ministerial capacities, she designed the Zero Tolerance Campaign Against Child Abuse and established relations with mainland China. Banda was Mutharika’s running mate in 2009 and won election as vice president, the first woman to hold that office in Malawi. In late 2010 she was expelled from the DPP after a dispute with Mutharika regarding who would succeed him as the DPP presidential candidate in the next election, but she continued to serve as vice president. Though she was out of official favour, her popularity did not diminish among the public because of her tough stance against government corruption and her strong campaigns for grassroots development and gender parity. In April 2011 she founded the People’s Party (PP) and was widely regarded as the major opposition to Peter Mutharika, brother of the president and likely DPP presidential candidate in the next election.

In 2012 President Mutharika’s death after he suffered a heart attack on April 5 was not immediately confirmed and led to a brief period of uncertainty regarding his successor, with his inner circle attempting to block Banda’s constitutional mandate to assume the presidency. But she successfully outflanked them and was sworn in as the fourth president of Malawi on April 7.

As president, Banda faced a difficult task. Malawi ranked as one of the world’s poorest countries and had experienced a deepening political crisis underscored by severe economic setbacks, including chronic fuel shortages and rising food prices. The new president’s resolute insistence that the government adhere to the constitution regarding political succession as well as her efforts soon after taking office to improve relations with foreign donors appeared to avert a political crisis and restored an optimistic outlook for general reform and change. Her pledges to overturn Malawi’s law that banned homosexual activities and eliminate government corruption were examples of the potential for change under her leadership.

Banda initiated austerity measures that won approval from the international community but were not popular at home. Her policies were somewhat effective, as donors resumed a flow of funding to Malawi and the country’s economic growth rate more than doubled during her first two years as president, but much of the country remained mired in poverty.

Banda’s pledge to root out corruption took centre stage in 2013 after the September assassination attempt on Paul Mphwiyo, the Ministry of Finance official whom Banda had appointed to investigate government corruption. The investigation into the attack soon brought to light a massive fraud and corruption scandal, which was dubbed “cash-gate” and allegedly involved senior-level government officials. Some members of Banda’s cabinet were allegedly involved, and on October 10 Banda dissolved her entire cabinet to ensure that the officials under suspicion did not interfere with the investigation. A preliminary report on the scandal indicated that at least $30 million had been stolen from the government. The total amount of government funds allegedly lost through corruption and fraud was estimated to be $100–$250 million.

The cash-gate scandal and its economic fallout—which included the loss of donor confidence and funding—followed Banda in the run-up to the May 2014 presidential, parliamentary, and local government elections. While Banda cited cash-gate as an example of how she was tackling corruption, opposition candidates countered with the observation that the scandal had occurred during her administration, reflecting poorly on her ability to manage the government, and some claimed that she benefited from the misappropriated funds. As the election drew near, Banda looked to be in a close race with Mutharika and two others from the field of 12 presidential candidates.

Voting on May 20, 2014, did not go smoothly, and polls were kept open a second and third day in areas that had experienced significant problems or delays. There were also delays with the tallying of the votes, and Banda and some opposition parties complained of voting irregularities and made allegations of vote rigging, although electoral observers generally agreed that, in spite of some problems, the elections were credible.

On May 24, shortly after partial results began to be released, Banda proclaimed that she was annulling the elections and ordering them to be re-held in 90 days, and she also said that she would not stand in the repeated presidential election. Her proclamation, however, was quickly overturned by the country’s High Court, which said that she did not have the power to annul the elections. The elections generated a flurry of legal filings, including a request by the Malawi Electoral Commission (MEC) to delay the scheduled release of results to allow for additional time to complete a partial recount of votes from some areas that appeared to have experienced voting anomalies or other problems, but on May 30 the High Court ordered the MEC to announce the results without completing a recount. Mutharika, who had obtained 36.4 percent of the vote, was declared the winner. Banda finished third, with 20.2 percent, and conceded.

Throughout her career Banda received awards and accolades, including the Africa Prize for Leadership for the Sustainable End of Hunger in 1997 (shared with Mozambican Pres. Joaquim Chissano) and being named Africa’s third most powerful woman by Forbes magazine in 2011.

LaRay Denzer
The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica

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British Investment firm CDC calls for Malawi business proposals – Malawi Nyasa Times

The British Investment firm CDC says it is raising millions of dollars for investments in Malawi and is open to receive proposals to grow entrepreneurs especially in the agro-processing sectors with potential to produce products for export.

Investors, Guests and Malawian diaspora at Malawi Business Group event

Investors, Guests and Malawian diaspora at Malawi Business Group event

High Commissioner Kena Mphonda admires Malawi products at Malawi UK Business Group reception

Dr Mohan Kaul, Patron of Malawi Business Group

Wigley, CDC Chairman

Watipaso Mkandawire a Malawian in diaspora engages some of the guests

CDC Chairman Graham Wigley who was main speaker at the inaugural Malawi Investment reception hosted by the Malawi UK Business Group in London on Monday evening, said the group had been investing in Malawi since 1949.

The Group is the initiative of the Malawi High Commission in London but is run independently by businesspersons, academics and Malawian diaspora interested in doing businesses or offer services to Malawi.

“We were involved in Viphya plantations and now our focus is the agriculture sector and grow entrepreneurs. Those Malawian businesses that are viable, we will always be willing to support and help them to grow,” said Wigley.

CDC’s Director and Head of Food and Agriculture Jean Habay told the high-profile reception that the firm had invested US$50 million in Donnas Eggs to increase production from 20 million eggs to 40 million eggs, making it the largest egg supplier in Malawi eyeing the export market.

“We also gave Standard Bank of Malawi US$25million to boost their lending to entrepreneurs as part of helping small scale businesses grow. We have also invested in Africa’s largest irrigated Macadamia nuts projects in Mzuzu. We hope to raise millions of dollars for further investments in Malawi and welcome those that have ideas to come and approach us,” said Habay.

Patron of the Malawi UK Business Group Mohan Kaul said the group had proven to be one of best platforms to expose Malawi’s hidden opportunities and linking investors with potential financiers in the UK was one of the key goals.

“We are grateful to CDC for being among the first investors to support this group and Malawi. We hope the businesses here will find it helpful to know where they can get support. Malawi is a great country with enormous potential to become the processing centre for African exports, the business climate has improved, it time to do business in Malawi,” said Dr. Kaul.

Malawi Investment and Trade Centre (MITC) Director of Investment Promotion Joshua Nthakomwa told the business, academic and British and Scottish Government officials at the event that Agriculture and Agro-processing are among the key investment opportunities businesses can immediately start in Malawi.

Nthakomwa floated fish farming at Lake Malawi,spinning of Cotton into Yarn through a US$17 million venture, fertiliser manufacturing plant,the 43,000 hectreShire Valley Transformation Project and the 275 hectreKasinthula Fish Industrial Park in Chikwawa and horticultureproject equity offered by the Airport Development Limited which all provide export opportunities for investors.

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Lake Malawi


Lake


The jewel in the crown of the country’s tourist attractions is Lake Malawi, “discovered” by the missionary-explorer Dr David Livingstone just over 150 years ago. Although totally landlocked, Malawi is not denied its “inland sea”. This vast body of freshwater fringed by beaches of golden sand is not only a scenic wonderland but it provides water sport opportunities for those looking for something beyond sun, sand and swimming. Its approximate dimensions are 365 miles north to south and 52 miles broad, hence the sobriquet: “the calendar lake”. The Lake, in the north, is quite extraordinarily deep: 2300 ft/700 m, plunging well below sea level. This reflects the enormity of the natural faulting of the Great Rift Valley, which is the origin of the Lake. The width of the lake’s shorelands vary from nothing to over 25 kilometres (16 miles), the edge of the Rift Valley rising steeply in places and more gently in others.

Because of its rich fish harvest, the Lake plays an important part in the economy. Fishing villages are scattered along the shore and the traditional industry and practices are an attraction to visitors. Access to the Lake is possible along much of its length but it should be noted that it is usually necessary to take a short detour off the main roads in order to reach the beach. Despite the attraction the Lake has to settlement, there are long stretches of totally uninhabited golden sand lakeshore, lapped by crystal clear waters. Kayaking, sailing, snorkelling, scuba diving and water skiing are just some of the lake activities available to visitors. Journeys by lake range from the famous motor vessel the Ilala to sailing in an ocean-going yacht. Cruises into the upper reaches of the great Shire river are also possible.

Places to Stay

Good lodges are now to be found the length of the lakeshore, with a few collections in areas of particular beauty. Between Mangochi and Monkey Bay is a long line of wonderful beaches backed by a variety of accommodation. This Mangochi Lakeshore has the Lake’s greatest concentration of lodges and hotels. Monkey Bay is a functional port town, but round the headland is Cape Maclear and the Lake Malawi National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a veritable aquarium of tropical fish. In recent years, a number of high quality lodges have been built in this area. Senga Bay is another place where there are a number of lodges & hotels, and it benefits from being the closest point on the lake to Lilongwe. The stretch between the historic Nkhotakota and the sugar estate town of Dwangwa has a smattering of lodges. Another concentration is found on the Chintheche lakeshore, which has some stunning beaches. Nkhata Bay is primarily a port town, but has grown as a centre for independent travellers. The Northern Lakeshore beyond Chitimba has fewer lodges, and Karonga, an important archeological centre, is the only town of note before reaching Tanzania. Across the lake, into Mozambiquan waters, is Likoma Island. Not only does it have some beautiful beaches, and accommodation, but also a missionary-built cathedral the size of Winchester’s. A nearby stretch of the Mozambique shoreline, Manda Wilderness, is a 120,000 hectare community reserve of unspoilt wilderness and white sand beaches.


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Malawi

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Doing Business in Malawi

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Malawi | Data

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EDITORIAL: This is not democracy, it’s anarchy!






Patricia KaliatiDPP cadets block Kaliati at Parliament accusing her of backing …

The Maravi Post joins Malawi Vice President, Dr. Saulos Klaus Chilima, in condemning the unfortunate and uncalled for scenes of violence and intimidation developing in this country.

These attacks culminated in the bizarre incidences where people took it upon themselves to try to bar the entry into the Parliament House of two Members Mrs Patricia Kaliati and Mr Noel Masangwi on Friday.

In addition to this, in their reaction, supposed supporters of Kaliati and Masangwi then made noise during the State President’s Opening Statement.

Both these are unfortunate and completely unacceptable.

While people have the right to hold opinions and express them, such freedom stops when it conflicts with another person’s freedom and rights. This was not the case on Friday.

In the case of the President, Professor Arthur Peter Mutharika, is protected by the Constitution and must be respected as all Members of Parliament know and must respect and observe at all times. As State President all lawmakers, which Parliamentarians are, must respect, protect, and preserve the President’s privileged right and earned honor to address the august House.

Additionally, the citizens of this land, who sent the Members to the House, through the vote, have a right to hear the President.

The Maravi Post joins Malawi Vice President, Dr. Saulos Klaus Chilima, in condemning the unfortunate and uncalled for scenes of violence and intimidation developing in this country.

These attacks culminated in the buzzards incidences where people took it upon themselves to try to bar the entry into the Parliament House of two Members Mrs Patricia Kaliati and Mr Noel Masangwi on Friday.

In addition to this, in their reaction, supposed supporters of Kaliati and Masangwi then made noise during the State President’s Opening Statement.

Both these are unfortunate and completely unacceptable.

While people have the right to hold opinions and express them, such freedom stops when it conflicts with another person’s freedom and rights. This was not the case on Friday.

In the case of the President, Professor Arthur Peter Mutharika, is protected by the Constitution and must be respected as all Members of Parliament know and must respect and observe at all times. As State President all lawmakers, which Parliamentarians are, must respect, protect, and preserve the President’s privileged right and earned honor to address the august House.

Additionally, the citizens of this land, who sent the Members to the House, through the vote, have a right to hear the President.

Making noise as the President speaks is rude, but it also shows that those Members forget they are being watched by the electorate who sent them there.

The Maravi Post takes umbrage with this and question’s the noise makers’ knowledge of the rules governing our country. They are Members in the House and should be knowledgeable of governing Parliamentary Procedures.

The Maravi Post applauds the Police who acted fast in saving all lives and dignity in these incidents that also included the setting ablaze of Mr Bon Kalindo’s car at his house. Indeed this act as the VP cites is an act of barbarism and has no place in modern Malawi.

The same applies to the vain attempts to prevent two sitting Members from entering the Parliament. In any democratic country, such attempts smack of dictatorial strains. They must end now.

Malawi’s 23-year old democracy must not be allowed to spiral into such levels of intolerance and abuse of freedom of speech and opinions.

As we cited above our rights, our freedoms stop where another person’s rights and freedoms begin. You cannot exercise your right, your freedom while abrogating the right and freedom of another person.

Long live genuine democracy!

The Maravi Post Editorial Team

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Malawi May Make Farting in Public Illegal as Governments Seek to Ban Bodily Functions

Hopefully she’s not burping in Florida after sundown.

Getty Images

Before you pass gas in Malawi, you might want to wait until you are in a private area.

A new bill in the country is trying to make it against the law to fart in public in order to “mold responsible and disciple citizens.” While the legislation does include fines for more potentially dangerous actions, including carrying weapons without lawful authority or reasonable excuse, fighting in public, or deceiving witnesses and destroying evidence, some Malawi citizens are claiming the flatulence clause is going a bit too far. “How can this government criminalize the release of intestinal gases … Everyone does that, even if it’s in public or it has an accompanying sound which is boring, making it criminal is a joke of democracy,” said one person to Afrik News.

(More on TIME.com: See the best pictures of the week)

Cutting the cheese isn’t only a offensive thing in Malawi though. According to Metromix Tampa Bay, it’s illegal to break wind in a public place after 6 PM on a Thursday. Other areas find inappropriate bodily functions legally upsetting as well. Spitting is frowned upon in Singapore warns the US Department of State, and if your child burps during a church service in Nebraska, you can be arrested.

NewsFeed’s favorite: In 2009, Ontario’s transportation minister aided in creating Canadian legislation that would fine people who were caught picking their nose while driving. Just because those you sitting behind those windows doesn’t mean we can’t see you through the glass.

(More on TIME.com: See the best cartoons of the week)

While all these things are disgusting, it’s impossible to find someone who has never accidentally committed one of these bodily faux pas in front of others. For everyone’s sake, we should try and save our disgusting noises for own homes, but if it happens, well, that’s just part of human nature. It’s embarrassing enough; you shouldn’t have to pay for it as well.

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Malawi Travel Guide

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HRCC lobby Malawi Parliament on drug suspect held in Hong Kong – Malawi Nyasa Times

The Human Righrs Consultative Committee (HRCC) has lobbied the Parliament Committee on International Relations to loggy government to help with the case of Estina Mukusera, 29, who is being held in a Hong Kong prison on suspicion of drug trafficking.

Estina Mkasela held in Hong Kong prison

Estina was arrested in Hong Kong on August 4 2018 on suspicion that he was smuggling drugs which were wrapped as chocolate.

She is expected ti appear in court on December 3 after the the case failed to take place in October because of language barrier as there was no interpreter.

HRCC chaierperson Robert Mkwezalamba and and Mukusera’s family members , they asked for her to be repatriated and tried in Malawi.

“We would like government to send a delegation during the December 3 hearing to interpret her case,” said Mkwezalamba.

The family also claimed drug lords are threatening them not to involve the police and insisted that Estina is a victim of trafficking.

Parliament’s International Relations Committee chairman Alex Meja said the government should take this as a matter of urgency.

But Meja blamed the increasing number of Malawian women dealing in drug trafficking to the worsening economic situation in the country and lapses in security systems.

“Our borders are porous, our security systems in airports have lapses,” he said.

He said it was worrisome that some Malawian women are facing death sentences or prolonged jail terms in India, Ethiopia, Nigeria and Thailand.

The government said the Malawian women are usually enticed by some crooked drug dealers from west Africa who promise huge sums of money after the drug trafficking

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Malawi lauds China for military support – Malawi Nyasa Times

Home Affairs and Internal Security minister, Cecilia Chazama, says the Malawi government is overly grateful to the support the Chinese government is rendering to the southern African nation since the establishment of bilateral relations over a decade ago.

Chazama (centre) says military relations between China and Malawi is important part of bilateral ties

Chazama made the sentiments in the capital Lilongwe during the 91 anniversary of armed forces day of People’s Republic of China at the Chinese Embassy.

She said there is a sound military cooperation between the Malawi Defence Force and the Chinese People’s Liberation Army.

Chazama said the military relations between China and Malawi is an important part of bilateral ties and the two militaries have gradually carried out friendly cooperation, as evidenced by exchange visits by military delegations of the two sides.

“From the time the two countries established diplomatic ties, Malawi has beneffited a lot and as we celebrate today, it is pleasing to note that the two countries are deepening the mutual understanding and trust in various military related fields,” said Chazama.

She added: “I wish to thank the Chinese Government for various support and aid to Malawi and we hope to strengthen cooperation and boost these existing relations.”

Chazama added: “I wish to assure you that Malawi will help further enhance the existing friendly relations between the defense departments and the militaries of the two countries in order to expand the existing cooperation.

“We are grateful that our officers, men and women in uniform are benefitting a lot from these bilateral relations. It is worth mentioning that China has offered several scholarships to the Malawi Defence Force which have been vital in promoting knowledge and skills of our soldiers.”

In his remarks, Chinese Ambassador to Malawi, Liu Hong Yang expressed Chinese Government’s commitment in ensuring continued bilateral relationship of the two countries.

Yang said security issues “are crucial” in the development of any country.

General Griffin Supuni Phiri the Commander of the Malawi Defence Force and his delegation attended the function.

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